BWF: Eulogy: Writing Grief

This was the third and final panel discussion that I attended at this year’s Brisbane Writers Festival. (Yes, I’m writing about them out of order.) When I went through the program, trying to decide which talks to go to, this was one that actually stood out for me.  Continue reading

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BWF: Marks left by Masterful Minds

This was the first panel discussion I attended at this year’s Brisbane Writers Festival. If you’ve been following my blog for a while, or if you know me in real life, it’s probably obvious why I’d be drawn to this talk, given its title (I’m alluding, of course, to my love of classic novels). The panel was chaired by Julianne Schultz, with guest writers Dennis Glover, Catherine Lacey and Jeff Sparrow. They had each researched and written books about inspiring and noteworthy individuals: for Glover it was George Orwell, Sparrow followed Paul Robeson, and Lacey researched various individuals in an intricate web of relationships.  Continue reading

BWF: star struck

The Brisbane Writers Festival was held at the State Library, with panel discussions conducted in several auditoriums throughout the complex. As such, there were many concurrent talks at any one time, and it might’ve been hard deciding which one to go to at each time slot, but this particular one was an easy choice for me.

The second of three talks (yes, I’m doing this out of order) that I attended at the BWF was titled “Ordinary People, Extraordinary Lives” and, like the title suggests, was about finding extraordinary things within the ordinary and everyday. This was a panel discussion, chaired by Steven Lang, with guests David Cohen, Robert Drewe and Kyo Maclear. I was drawn to this event because it’s something that eternally fascinates me, and it’s part of the reason why I read blogs, and why I enjoy talking to customers at work, and why I usually try to be the one asking questions in a conversation, etc, etc. Continue reading

Brisbane Writers Festival 2017

Yesterday I attended a few panel discussions that were held as part of the annual Brisbane Writers Festival. I’d previously only attended the BWF once before, several years ago, and, for various reasons, hadn’t been back since. I was either too busy, or had other things on; perhaps I found out about it too late, and didn’t have a chance to get tickets for the talks I was interested in; or maybe there was part of me that thought my time would be better spent actually writing rather than hearing about things that other people wrote.

This year, however, I felt compelled to go, and thank goodness I did!  Continue reading

writing by hand

I learnt to touch-type sometime around Grade five. The vast majority of my writing is on the computer, but I still like handwriting things sometimes. In fact, there are times when I actually crave it, and I feel a need to pick up a pen and just write something.

Kids these days, I believe, are probably learning to type at a younger age. It is essential, surely (maybe not at that age, but in their lives it will be an essential skill) but so is good handwriting. I’ll not be the first to lament the declining value placed on handwriting – I’m sure I’ve read and heard plenty of people reflect on this subject before – so, instead, let’s celebrate what handwriting there is to celebrate.

Continue reading