the joy of learning

All through my childhood and school years, I did quite well academically. I liked school (mostly), I enjoyed learning new things, and I relished any opportunity to show that I was a bright and capable student (except I was never that kid who put their hand up to answer questions in class).

After finishing high school, I went straight into university, and did my Pharmacy degree. Although there was a bit of an adjustment phase to this new learning structure, I did enjoy university too. There was something of a thrill in being presented with this new level of intellectual challenge.

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we will adapt

The conversation that was the inspiration for this post actually happened several weeks ago (maybe even months, it has been so long I’m not entirely sure). This is one of those times when a seemingly ordinary conversation lingered in my mind a lot longer than I would have expected (if it was in any way possible to independently consider and speculate on how long a conversation might linger).

But the conversation didn’t necessarily produce the epiphany or realisation itself. Rather, it served as a kind of impetus for me to put the thoughts I’d previously had into words. This will (hopefully) make sense later. Continue reading

let’s catch up …maybe

These last few weeks have been pretty hectic. Everything’s a bit of a blur. I’ve been doing a lot of overtime at work because of this new arrangement in place involving other hospitals. (Can’t say too much, of course, because of privacy reasons or whatever.) I just worked six consecutive days – some of which were 11-12 hour days – and I am quite exhausted, but also not. I think I’ve just been running on adrenaline all week because I only had a total of maybe 3 cups of coffee and one cup of tea the whole week (and the most recent two beverages were probably unnecessary anyway).

Well, maybe we’ll call it adrenaline and fear/panic. There have been many times these last few weeks when I’ve felt like I was working as if my life depended on it. It’s like a fear of death (i.e. consequences) or fear of God (i.e. management – except I’m not really afraid of management; they’ve been very supportive). Continue reading

the article that could save lives (or at least prevent some pain)

No, this is nothing to do with magic cure-alls, silver bullets or even preventative lifestyle advice. And it’s certainly not an article I wrote, but one I chanced upon.

One morning, a few weeks ago, I went into the staff tea room for my ten-minute morning tea break, and found a print-out copy of this article on the table: When Evidence Says No, but Doctors Say Yes (by David Epstein & Propublica, published by The Atlantic on February 22, 2017). I was intrigued, and started reading.

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measuring up

I’m kind of sorry to be writing this, but I feel like it needs to be done. (I realise this makes it sound like the following post will be super serious or controversial in its content, but it probably isn’t really – sorry to disappoint. But, I dunno, maybe it depends on how you look at it. I reckon this will mostly just sound very rant-y. Yeah, definitely very rant-y.)

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