managing care

I have been in middle management for about a year and a half now, and there are still times when I wonder if I’m doing this “managing” thing right, or if I’m really cut out to be a manager. But I guess the day I stop wondering how to do things better is the day I stop improving (and there’s always something that can be improved on).

When new people start work in my department, there are a few things I tell them, regardless of their role or their previous work experience:

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obscure reviews: Hydralyte

I remember back in my first year of uni (which feels like many years ago), one of the tutors told us they once knew a student who liked to go and try out over-the-counter (OTC) medications so that they would be better able to counsel patients about these. But, of course, it would be irresponsible and going against the “Quality Use of Medicines” principles to use a medication if you didn’t have the condition being treated, so they had to somehow have/get the specific ailments first.

Now, I’m not sure if they went out of their way to get cold sores, diarrhoea, common cold symptoms, heartburn and other conditions treatable with OTC medicines, but they supposedly worked their way through a fair few products (I’m not sure which — I just chose some random examples here).

Anyway… I never took this approach to my learning, but I suppose there are some things that are useful to try in order to make better recommendations to others. I discovered this in this last week when I got food poisoning and became very dehydrated. I’ll spare you the details, but I was quite unwell for several days, and wasn’t eating or drinking much in case it made me throw up. Continue reading

adrift

As we enter a new year, and a lot of people are contemplating what they want to achieve, what they want to change, or what they want to keep and nourish; I, quite honestly, feel a little lost. But maybe not so much lost as “adrift” or “suddenly aware that I’ve been adrift for a while, riding the gentle waves of a lake, no longer sure what shore I left from or which bank I need to go to”.

Of course, there’s nothing inherently wrong with the situation – there’s no storm brewing, no predator beneath the surface of the water, no structural problem with the boat, or shortage of supplies – but I feel a little adrift. Continue reading

Thursday Doors: a Swiss contribution

I feel like I’ve been very absent from the Thursday Doors scene – in fact, I know that I’ve been very absent because I’ve missed many weeks of Thursday Doors viewing and posting now. And I must apologise, but hopefully I can get back to a more regular TD schedule (probably still not weekly, but maybe every 2-3 weeks)

I’ve actually been re-inspired by a friend who’s honeymooning in Europe at the moment. She sent me a few photos of some lovely Swiss doors she’s found. I’d forgotten that I’d even told her about TD, but she clearly hadn’t forgotten!  Continue reading

Thursday Doors: home again

Since I shared Melbourne photos in my last Thursday Doors post, I felt like doing some Brisbane photos this time – two doors from immediately after my trip, and immediately before it.

When I came home from my trip, I attended a pharmacy conference, which was held in the function rooms of the Rydges Hotel. Funnily enough, very few conference attendees seemed to be staying at the hotel, since it was rather expensive, even with a conference discount…  Continue reading

the article that could save lives (or at least prevent some pain)

No, this is nothing to do with magic cure-alls, silver bullets or even preventative lifestyle advice. And it’s certainly not an article I wrote, but one I chanced upon.

One morning, a few weeks ago, I went into the staff tea room for my ten-minute morning tea break, and found a print-out copy of this article on the table: When Evidence Says No, but Doctors Say Yes (by David Epstein & Propublica, published by The Atlantic on February 22, 2017). I was intrigued, and started reading.

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