a revision of goals and reading

[This post is a continuation from my post last week about reading goals.]

Going from reading to study, I’ve decided to commit at least another two years to my self-guided Persian/Farsi studies. I think I will need the rest of this year to finish working my way through the text book I bought, and then another year to be able to read The Little Prince and other texts that my friend has lent me. I’m not sure that all of this will enable me to hold an actual conversation with someone, but I hope I can reach a level of proficiency that I’m happy with and that my friend approves of.

And while on the topic of study, I suppose I ought to announce some sort of commitment to my CPD (continuing professional development). Last year, I attained the requisite 40 CPD points reasonably early on in the year, and very much neglected it for the rest of the year in favour of Persian and other things. Now I’m at a point where I feel like my knowledge is not nearly as polished as it used to be, and I realise I need to make this a regular thing rather than a “cram as many CPD activities into the shortest amount of time” thing. This will probably mean regular reading of Pharmacy journals, and maybe watching online lectures when I can. Continue reading

the article that could save lives (or at least prevent some pain)

No, this is nothing to do with magic cure-alls, silver bullets or even preventative lifestyle advice. And it’s certainly not an article I wrote, but one I chanced upon.

One morning, a few weeks ago, I went into the staff tea room for my ten-minute morning tea break, and found a print-out copy of this article on the table: When Evidence Says No, but Doctors Say Yes (by David Epstein & Propublica, published by The Atlantic on February 22, 2017). I was intrigued, and started reading.

Continue reading

2015 report card

Since it is suddenly the last week of the year, I thought I should probably get on with publishing some end-of-year type posts (or at least one such post).

I think 2015 has been a pretty good year overall. This is mostly because if I don’t think about it too much, mostly good memories float to the surface, and the rest of it is somewhere underneath. Well, I probably said the same thing about 2014, but I kind of feel like this year has been better. I mean, I can’t really think of any super significant events from last year (but, again, I’m not thinking super hard on this one because there’s no time for that!)

I already wrote a post earlier this month (partially) about my reading goals for the year, which I managed to accomplish satisfactorily (to my standards, anyway). Next year, I only want to read (at a minimum) four books: David Copperfield, Anna Karenina, Love in the time of Cholera, and Ulysses. I’ll try to read them in that order, and hopefully I don’t get overly side-tracked by other books and recommendations along the way.

Another goal I was quite happy with (surprisingly so) was fitness-related. I’d set myself the challenge of achieving a 3-minute plank …and by the end of October I was doing 4-minute planks …and twice in December I’ve completed a 5-minute plank (5 min 10 sec to be exact). I’m not entirely sure why this has been such an important goal for me, but I was pretty stoked to get to 4 and then 5 minutes. I’ll just have to keep increasing the goal incrementally on this one.

Unfortunately, I did not achieve my other fitness goal of running at least once a week (or fortnight at the very least) because, well, life happened. I’m going to forgive myself for this one, however, because I reckon my fitness hasn’t declined, and that’s always a plus.

Something else I didn’t achieve was taking at least three weeks of annual leave this year. I wouldn’t say I’m a workaholic, but I like my job, and I tend to just not think very much about taking holidays. Consequently, I have a lot of annual leave accrued, and I kind of thought I should use some of it. This year I’ve only taken two weeks off in total, but if you count my time in Rocky as a “working holiday”, then I’ve totally smashed this goal.

I wasn’t going to mention CPD (continuing professional development) because I haven’t gotten any CPD points this last month, and I’ve just been avoiding even thinking about it at all, and I keep telling myself that I can get back into it next year …but I actually did pretty well with CPD this year, so I figure it’s worth a mention. The minimum requirement was 40 points, so of course I set my goal at 80 points. And before too long – actually, no, it did take a long time – I had over 100 points. As proud as I am of this blatant nerdiness, I might reign in this goal for next year (mostly so that I can prioritise other things).

Last but certainly not least: my blogging goal. As always, I wanted to maintain my one-post-per-week minimum. WordPress stats tells me that, including this post, I’ll have posted 90 posts this year. By my maths, that’s two posts per week on most weeks. (It actually makes me wonder how it’s possible that I have had that much to write about.) Don’t think I will change this goal for next year, since a two-or-more-posts-per-week requirement sounds like too much pressure. But we’ll see what happens.

professionally developing

Back in the studying mood again. I attribute this to the two-day workshop I went to today and yesterday. I just hope that I can keep up this studying mood because I have to follow up on this workshop next year. (Plus, I’m sure a bit of studying will be of some help with pre-reg year.)

Parts of the workshop made me feel like I was back in 4th year tutorials. It was a good feeling. It was nice being back at PACE. Something tells me that I’m never going to get away from that place for good (not that I mind, really).

The only bad thing was that we had pretty good weather this weekend, and I had to spend most of it inside, as is usually the case. Then it started to rain when I left this afternoon. Didn’t mind the rain so much, since it made the air so nice and cool, but thunder and lightning don’t quite make for a pleasant walk.

As I walked home, before the thunder and lightning came on, I was thinking about the concept of continuing professional development (CPD) (after the thunder and lightning came on, I was just thinking about getting home as quickly and dryly as possible).

It sort of sucks (“sort of”? some would say it definitely sucks) that we have to keep paying money to stay registered/accredited and whatever. Would be nice to say that it’s not about the money and that we should be thinking of nobler things, but people can’t live off gratitude and rapport (although.. you possibly could, depending on how these were expressed).

I guess maybe if professional development events, etc were free (or cheaper), then more people may be inclined to participate and we may have a more professionally developed profession. But the economist part of my mind is quick to add that setting prices too low would result in demand far exceeding supply, and we can’t have that happening.

I wish it was easier to get CPD points but, at the same time, part of me relishes the challenge.