take one, pass it on

I have a Twitter account that I don’t use very often, but I happened to be browsing Twitter last night, and saw that Post Secret had retweeted something from “The Compliment Project”.

Intrigued, as I was lying in bed this morning, trying to decide if I want to get out of bed yet or just lie there for a bit longer, I searched up what this “Compliment Project” was. (Yeah, I could have looked it up last night when I saw it but I was too tired to be bothered (but not tired enough to not be randomly browsing Twitter…?) Anyway, I still thought of it this morning.)

Turns out, it was started by artist Anna Sergeeva (in California?) Ok, to be honest, I didn’t read that much into it; I read enough to know what it’s about i.e. spreading compliments and hence kindness and positivity and love and all the rest of it.

Anyway, despite my lack of detailed research into this (to be fair, it was Sunday morning, and I’d just woken up), I totally think this is a great idea. I’m going to put some up tomorrow, and help spread The Compliment Project to Australia.

You can download the official posters from the website: https://www.thecomplimentproject.org/

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it starts with 1

The other day, a friend of mine shared a photo of a large-scale sculpture of a couple of fish made mostly from plastic bottles. The sculptures are displayed on a beach (I think in Brazil somewhere) and were intended to draw attention to the amount of litter found on beaches and in oceans.

However, scrolling through the comments attached to the photo, I found out that the bottles were only glued on (with an apparently flimsy glue) and, over time, have begun falling off the sculpture. Kind of ironic, but I suppose the message was still getting through.

The photo was initially shared on FB by an organisation called “1 Million Women“, and came with the harrowing prediction that by the year 2050, there will be more plastic in the ocean than fish. After browsing their FB page briefly, I followed the link to their official website, and actually ended up spending about an hour just reading articles there.

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rethinking alcohol

For some time now (over the last few months? this year? since last year? not really sure…) I’ve been pondering about the drinking culture in Australia, and reflecting on people’s relationships with alcohol (including my own). You don’t have to be an expert in public health to know that alcohol contributes to a lot of health problems (long- and short-term), and can lead to death. For some time, I’ve been thinking of writing a post about all this, but just kept putting it off. But when I read this post by George at The Off Key of Life, I thought I’d lend my support and do my bit (and basically add my two cents’ worth).

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Thursday Doors – Launceston

I’ve been following the blog Joeyfully Stated for quite some time now. I don’t remember how I found it, but when I did, hitting the “follow” button was kind of a no-brainer because Joey is just really funny and really honest, and I suppose there’s something weirdly fascinating about the life of a stranger on the other side of the world.

Joey also participates in this blogging feature/event called Thursday Doors, which is hosted/run by Norm 2.0. From what I gather, Thursday Doors is exactly what it sounds like: every Thursday, people publish posts/photos about interesting doors. Yes, it’s apparently that simple.

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why I’m here

Last week I read a rather thought-provoking post on Campari & Sofa about the reasons why people live where they do, and the things that draw people to certain places. (I was going to just leave a comment on that post, but then realised that I couldn’t do so succinctly, and so this post was born.)

I, personally, have not moved a lot in my life – Brisbane has always been my hometown – so I think you could almost say that I’m kind of just here by default. I sometimes feel like a bit of an anomaly in my generation, for various reasons, but no less because I don’t have a strong compulsion to travel. It’s not that I have zero interest in travel and exploring new places – I think that’d be an amazing experience – and it’s not that I don’t have the means or time for travel; but I don’t daydream about it the same way my contemporaries might. And if I’m not dreaming about holidaying in these far-off places, I’m certainly not dreaming about making a long-term move to a foreign country.

Please don’t misunderstand – I’m not xenophobic or otherwise afraid. I think I’m simply … complacent or content. I am also probably just really attached to my hometown and, of course, to the people in it. I’ve always thought that if I had to uproot myself, I’d probably go to Melbourne, a city where a lot of my friends and family already live, and a city that I’ve already visited many times in my life. The only daunting thing is that Melbourne is so much bigger than Brisbane. I generally think Brisbane is a good size: big enough that there are things to do and places to go, but small enough that it’s not overwhelming and it doesn’t take forever to get anywhere.

In my pondering, I also thought of a conversation I had with a taxi driver in Rockhampton on one of my visits. He was perhaps 50 or thereabouts, and I asked him about how long he’s lived in Rocky. (I usually find it easier to make people talk about themselves than to talk about myself.) He told me that he’d actually grown up in Rocky, had moved to Brisbane for work at one point in his life, but then returned to Rocky to settle down. His children had all grown up and moved to bigger cities, but he thought that even Brisbane was too big a city for him.

For those unfamiliar with Australian cities: Brisbane’s population is about 2 million now; Rocky’s is about 115,000, according to Google. In comparison, Melbourne and Sydney have over 4 million people each. On a side note, but kind of related, Google also tells me that the population of Paris is comparable to Brisbane’s, at about 2.2 million. This actually really surprised me until I did a comparison of land area, and found out that Brisbane is more than 50 times the size of Paris. I suppose our suburbs are just really spread out.

If I ever move away from Brisbane, I reckon I’ll eventually end up back in Brisbane, just as my cab driver returned to Rocky. But I don’t think that I’m impulsive enough to pack up and move somewhere on a whim because I’ve fallen in love with a place, so it’d have to be thought-out and practical. And then, if I do move (after so much consideration), it theoretically would not be impossible for me to fall into the same contented complacency with this new city. And then perhaps I wouldn’t return to Brisbane, except to visit the people and places I’ve left behind. (I almost want to move overseas just to test this theory out. Almost.)

I’ve previously discussed with fellow Brisbane-ites the virtues of living where we do, and one point that was raised was that it makes everywhere else in the world seem more magical. This might have been said sarcastically, but it is kind of valid. I mean, if I go on holiday, I want to feel like I’m on holiday, far removed from my usual life. And when I come home, I want it to feel like home.

 

talk about it

Since I spend a lot of time reading blogs, I do come across many wonderful blog posts on many various things. Some days I feel like a bit of a blog addict (or blog whore? I don’t suppose either is very politically correct, but since when is political correctness important in the blogosphere?), commenting and “liking” several blog posts in one night. Well, that usually happens when I haven’t been on WordPress for a long time, and have lots to catch up on, so I suppose that’s ok (?)

Very occasionally, I come across a post that inspires something incredible in me, and I feel compelled to share it and/or tell everyone about it. Tonight, I read one such post.

Silence Killed the Dinosaurs is a blog I usually go to for amusement and laughs, but the most recent post was a bit more serious. But, my goodness, this is a message that needs to be shared!

I would provide some sort of blurb for the post, but, honestly, you just need to go and read it.